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diverse hiring

Brandon Gilbert standing in a walkway between buildings. He is wearing a green jacket with roses on it and a baseball cap.
2016 Year in Review by Danielle S. Reed on December 13th, 2016
" see it within the first two years in the tech world that you’re just being consumed as a pillar of knowledge instead of a pillar of greatness."
Close-up of the red asphalt of a race track.
Issue 43 by Nikki Brown on November 15th, 2016
There’s plenty of evidence that the competitive, “best in show” approach used in interviewing extends into the core of tech culture itself.
A crossed-out universal access sign against trees, text reading 'Non-ADA Trail'.
Issue 38 by David Peter on June 22nd, 2016
Accessibility must be part of every aspect of business, part of the minimally viable product, a core part of how we approach the launch and growth of our platforms.
Swirling whirlpool of muddy water.
Issue 32 by February Keeney on February 1st, 2016
Being trans brings an entire new layer of bias and discrimination to play in every interview.
A cracked egg.
2015 Year in Review by Riley H on December 14th, 2015
Companies have made it crystal clear that they don’t actually care about the diversity they’re supposed to be working on.
Artsy photo of a ladder leading up a 90-degree wall, smoke billowing at the top.
Issue 26 by Anna on September 1st, 2015
The job search in tech equals an unpaid full-time job.
Command center on a frozen lake.
Programming by Marco Rogers on January 21st, 2015
Command-based vs service-based management.
Open notebook with a pen lying on the binding.
Hiring by The Editor on November 20th, 2014
Addressing hiring holistically.
Traditional brick building on an Ivy-League campus.
Hiring by Cate Huston on November 18th, 2014
The tech industry prides itself on its rationality, and yet is filled with trite slogans that are demonstrably untrue... and further, harmful.
Edge of a chalkboard.
Hiring by Anonymous Author on November 17th, 2014
I don’t want to be on an engineering team with people who were primarily chosen by their ability to write code on a whiteboard.