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pipeline

Donna and Cameron standing outside of a brick building, reviewing notes.
Issue 42 by Kerstin Kollmann on October 18th, 2016
In an online survey I conducted, two-thirds of respondents thought depictions of female tech experts were “not particularly accurate” or even “very inaccurate”.
Founders of WOC in Tech Chat, working together on a laptop.
Issue 42 by Carol Benovic on October 17th, 2016
Support their initiatives, spread the word, and create positive change for someone, too.
Large sculptures of dandelions beneath a bridge, surreal in a fading light.
Issue 41 by Emily Cobbs on September 6th, 2016
I still can’t see myself in role models or dream jobs.
Two women of color pair program at a standing desk in an office environment.
Issue 40 by Tiffany Mikell on August 17th, 2016
A growing number of tech educational programs don’t center our lived experiences or the things that motivate us as learners.
Close-up of a brightly colored, simple-looking 3d printer, fabricating a small, unknown object.
Issue 36 by Ansh Patel on April 26th, 2016
Who controls the machines? How are they made? And who makes them?
Two people working together to make something on a pottery wheel.
Issue 34 by Terri Burns on March 15th, 2016
While side projects can be a great indicator of personality, ability, and work-ethic, they should not have as much ability to make or break someone’s career.
Picture frames against a wall.
Issue 34 by Tilde Ann Thurium on March 14th, 2016
Bootcamps are a micro example of how the tech industry is built on the emotional labor of the same groups who are marginalized within it.
Teens of color working in groups on a few laptop computers.
Issue 33 by Natasha Vianna on February 22nd, 2016
If programs to get youth into tech are adding an extra layer of difficulty for young people, rather than improving their lives, why would they enter and stay?
Photo of brightly-colored marbles, suspended in air over a field.
Issue 32 by Dr. Nicole Forsgren & Jez Humble on February 4th, 2016
Two ideas conspire to drive underrepresented groups from the field: the belief that innate ability and brilliance are required to succeed; and the belief that certain groups of people do not have that innate brilliance.
Person pictured behind sheets, pressing their hand against the fabric.
2015 Year in Review by Stephanie Morillo on December 16th, 2015
Protecting yourself online takes time, money and privilege.