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women leaders

Founders of WOC in Tech Chat, working together on a laptop.
Issue 42 by Carol Benovic on October 17th, 2016
Support their initiatives, spread the word, and create positive change for someone, too.
Transcribe Online logo: the words in a fun, bubbly font and a 'T' speech bubble wrapped in headphones.
Issue 41 by Alice Wong & Katie Klabusich & Raquel Hosein & Wagatwe Wanjuki on September 6th, 2016
"We’re hoping it can change lives as well as movement and organizing work."
ehi_kitchen
Issue 37 by Ehi Aimiuwu-Jinadu on May 23rd, 2016
The kids are screaming, and I show it in my videos while I’m recording. Who has time to reshoot? This is life.
Two women from the #WOCinTech photoshoot standing in front of a whiteboard, arms crossed and smiling at the camera.
Issue 35 by Stephanie Morillo & Christina Morillo on March 29th, 2016
How to find sponsorship and bring your vision to life!
A ceiling light glowing in a dark room.
Issue 32 by Shanley Kane on February 4th, 2016
We never interrogate exactly what we have become aware of, or what it’s all been for.
Swirling whirlpool of muddy water.
Issue 32 by February Keeney on February 1st, 2016
Being trans brings an entire new layer of bias and discrimination to play in every interview.
Photo of the workshop space. Various members of Team Free To Pee are involved in various activities—some are bent over working on a blue plastic prototype seat, some are standing, some are sitting and some are in wheelchairs in the middle of the action.
Issue 29 by Alice Wong on November 5th, 2015
Makeathons and other similar events want to “do good” and “make the world a better place.” The people behind these events need to realize *how* they do them is as important as *why* they are doing them.
Image with a magenta background and hand-drawn in black ink the figure of a woman in a wheelchair with short hair—her mouth is open wide and there is a caption bubble in yellow that reads “To pee or not to pee, that’s NOT the question!”
Issue 29 by Alice Wong on November 4th, 2015
Very often, specialized companies create assistive technology with little input from actual users with disabilities. These products are usually institutional in look and feel, overpriced, and only reimbursable by insurance.
R*Q~L at the DJ set-up, standing next to Leah McFly on the computer.
Issue 29 by Alyce Currier on November 3rd, 2015
We still see male-dominated lineup after male-dominated lineup, at clubs and festivals predominantly run by male bookers and promoters.
Time-lapse shot of a hand waving in the air, appearing almost transparent.
Issue 29 by Michelle Lee on November 2nd, 2015
Evidence that Asian American women haven't been fully included in technology is found not only in recent lawsuits, but in the lack of Asian American women in tech leadership.